Cultural Protocols

The ACT Government recognises the Ngunnawal people as the traditional custodians of the ACT and surrounding region. The ACT Government’s adoption of the use of the term ‘Ngunnawal’ to identify the traditional custodians of the ACT is based on advice from a special meeting of Ngunnawal community members in May 2002.

The ACT Government recognises the Ngunnawal people as the traditional custodians of the ACT and surrounding region.

The ACT Government’s adoption of the use of the term ‘Ngunnawal’ to identify the traditional custodians of the ACT is based on advice from a special meeting of Ngunnawal community members in May 2002.

Welcome to Country

A Welcome to Country is when an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander custodian or local region elder welcomes people to their land. This can be done through speech, song, dance or ceremony, and has been part of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander protocol for thousands of years. The exact customs will vary from region to region.

Acknowledgement of Country

If you are not able to arrange for an elder to attend your event, or it is deemed too small to warrant a formal Welcome to Country, you could make the following acknowledgement:

“I/We wish to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land we are meeting on, the Ngunnawal people. I/we wish to acknowledge and respect their continuing culture and the contribution they make to the life of this city and this region. I/we would also like to acknowledge and welcome other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who may be attending today’s event.”

Protocols for working with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples

The Community Engagement Protocols for the ACT Aboriginal and /or Torres Strait Islander communities are a resource guide for all public, private, and not-for-profit sector agencies and organisations seeking to engage with our communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags

Recognition of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags was recommended in Recognition Rights and Reform.

Page last updated on: 14 Sep 2018